TWO HUNDRED AND TWENTY ONE BAKER STREETS edited by David Thomas Moore

An anthology of short stories featuring differing takes on the character of Sherlock Holmes, with settings as far back as medieval England to late 60s New York City to the future. This book contains 14 stories from a variety of authors, all of whom bring something different and interesting to the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson.

I must admit to being something of a traditionalist when it comes to Sherlock Holmes, mainly due to the fact that I have a great fondness for the Victorian England setting, equally as much as I do the characters. So I went into this book with fairly low expectations, not based on the authors but instead on my narrow view of whether I would probably accept the idea of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson being anywhere across time and place. I’m pleased to say that, to a large degree, the authors confounded my own narrow-minded expectations.

It was interesting to see how the characters could be interpreted in different ways. Whilst it’s fair to say that not all of the stories worked for me – a feeling not unknown with anthologies containing short stories from different writers – there was much fun to be had with the ones I really did enjoy. It’s testament to the authors that the character of Holmes, despite changes in sex and location and time settings, feels consistent enough with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s character as to remain relevant. Recommended, especially to fans of Sherlock Holmes with an open view to the original canon.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

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